All posts by Patrick Lynch

Artist | writer | designer | photographer Patrick J. Lynch is a Senior Digital Officer in the Office of Public Affairs and Communications at Yale University. In his 43 years with Yale University he has been a medical illustrator, biomedical and scientific photographer, audiovisual producer, and for the past 30 years a director of media and communications service units, and a designer of interactive multimedia teaching, training, and informational software and Web sites. Lynch has won over 30 national and international awards for his medical illustration, publications, and software design, including a 2012 National Outdoor Book Award, the 2005 Pirelli INTERNETional Awards for Best Overall multimedia teaching site, and best site from higher education, the 1992 Best-in-Show Award from the Health Sciences Communications Association and a Gold Medal, Silver Medal and Award of Excellence in the international INVISION Multimedia Awards. Lynch has authored over 100 professional papers, magazine articles, and book chapters. He has been a consultant and invited speaker on Web design and Web communications issues to many universities, government agencies, corporations, and non-profits groups, and regularly does talks, workshops, and professional papers on communications management, biocommunications, academic computing, medical illustration, biomedical visualization, and Web strategy and production management. In 2011 Yale University Press published his latest book, A Field Guide to the Southeast Coast & Gulf of Mexico, a winner of the National Outdoor Book Award for 2012 for field guidebooks. Previous National Outdoor Book Award winners include Farley Mowat, Robert Michael Pyle, David Attenborough, Roderick Nash, Richard Bangs, and Aldo Leopold.

Photoshop illustration of a Labrador Duck.

Labrador duck drake

Labrador Duck drake (Camptorhynchus labradorius), an extinct species that once wintered off the New England and mid-Atlantic coasts. Last seen alive in 1875. A reminder that we can lose whole species, and that we stand to lose many more in the next century if we don't change our ways very soon. Photoshop illustration.

Head detail of a Labrador Duck illustration.

Labrador Duck (detail)

  Labrador Duck drake (Camptorhynchus labradorius), head detail. Photoshop illustration.

Bowl of pho bo Vietnamese beef noodle soup.

Faux pho — Vietnamese beef noodle soup

A re-engineering of a favorite wintertime soup, Pho bo, or Vietnamese beef noodle soup. Real pho is made from an hours-long simmer of beef bones to make a light beef stock, but this recipe can be made on a weeknight in under an hour. Feeds four, and requires about 45 minutes to prepare. For the ...

Twisted sassafras tree trunks in a forest.

Sassafras trees

Sassafras tree trunks, Bluff Point State Park. I've always been fascinated by the strange, twisted forms of sassafras groves.  

Common Tern chicks and an egg in a nest on the beach.

Birth of a Common Tern

A sequence (on Flickr) of photos of a Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) hatching from its egg. Shot in 1981 when I was a volunteer on a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service tern banding project on Falkner Island, off Guilford, Connecticut, U.S.A.

Disruptive camouflage

When you look at a Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus) in isolation it looks boldly-striped—the antithesis of what you'd expect from an animal trying to blend into its background. But in natural settings the black-and-white stripes work very effectively to break up the silhouette of the bird, making it surprisingly hard to spot against the background. At Hammonsasset ...

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)

Wood Duck family (Aix sponsa). Photoshop painting. Available as a limited edition print.

Photo of the finished slow-cooker chili on a plate.

Beef & tomato chili in a slow cooker

A slow-cooked beef chili with the accent on tomatoes, and finished with fresh vegetables. Serve it with kidney beans and rice if you must, but I prefer a bed of green beans, fresh baby corn, asparagus or other veggies. This recipe just fits a 4 quart slow cooker.

Photo of a Great Black-backed Gull with a leg entangled in fishing line.

The dangers of ‘ghost gear’

Discarded monofilament line and other fishing gear can be incredibly persistent and deadly in the environment. Experts estimate that modern monofilament line will take as much as 600 years to fully degrade in marine conditions. That's 600 years of deadly entanglements and thousands of dead or maimed animals. This Great Black-backed Gull's foot is entangled ...

Photo of the beach and surf at Cape Canaveral National Seashore, Florida.

“Saving the world requires saving democracy. That requires well-informed citizens. Conservation, environment, poverty, community, education, family, health, economy—these combine to make one quest: liberty and justice for all. Whether one's special emphasis is global warming or child welfare, the cause is the same cause. And justice comes from the same place being human comes from: ...